Latest Reports and Publications

September, 2014

IOBC WPRS Bulletin, 2014, 102: 37-43.
The article is available  here at a cost

Abstract: Rose Buitenhuis. We have been doing a lot of research to optimize biocontrol and to convince growers that biocontrol is the way to go, but good pest control is still hit or miss because we still concentrate too much on the individual components instead of on the whole picture. Using the systems approach, I think we can build more robust IPM programs and identify areas of weakness that have to be addressed by research or innovation.

July, 2014

Biocontrol Science and Technology, 2014, 24 (10): 1153-1166.
The article is available here to individuals with subscription.

Abstract: Rosemarije Buitenhuis, Erik Glemser and Angela Brommit. This research investigated factors that affect the performance of Neoseiulus cucumeris (Oudemans) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) slow release sachets, focusing on dispersal in environments with non-continuous canopies and high exposure to greenhouse environmental conditions. When released from a central plant in a tray, the distribution of N. cucumeris across all other plants was uneven with the majority of mites recovered at the release point. Shading by a plant canopy reduced the mean internal temperature of the sachets, temperature peaks were less pronounced and the relative humidity was higher than in exposed sachets. Most N. cucumeris left the exposed sachets in the first week, followed by reduced emergence and no signs of breeding were observed in the sachets. Sachets in a plant canopy had low emergence during the first week, increasing thereafter. Overall, plant canopy sachets released more N. cucumeris than exposed sachets. Emergence patterns of N. cucumeris from sachets under greenhouse and ideal conditions were variable, with sachets generally performing better under ideal conditions. Even under constant ideal conditions, the number of N. cucumeris released from sachets varied among batches and some produced a suboptimal number of predators. Results demonstrate that exposed greenhouse conditions can seriously affect the performance of N. cucumeris sachets and that good coverage is needed to compensate for limited dispersal in non-continuous plant canopies.

July, 2014

Genome Announcements, 2014, 2 (4).
Click here to read the article

Abstract: Abdelbaset I. Yagubi, Alan J. Castle, Andrew M. Kropinski, Travis W. Banks and Antonet M. Svircev. The complete genome of an Erwinia amylovora bacteriophage, vB_EamM_Ea35-70 (Ea35-70), is 271,084 bp, encodes 318 putative proteins, and contains one tRNA. Comparative analysis with other Myoviridae genomes suggests that Ea35-70 is related to the Phikzlikevirus genus within the family Myoviridae, since 26% of Ea35-70 proteins share homology to proteins in Pseudomonas phage φKZ.

Ontario horticulture research priority report 2014
June, 2014

Features

  • Edible horticulture
  • Ornamental horticulture
June, 2014

Journal of Pest Science, 2014, 87 (2): 249-258.
The article is available here at a cost

Abstract: Alexandra Grygorczyk, Jessica Turecek and Isabelle Lesschaeve. The current study aimed to determine how the pest management practice applied during crop production may impact consumer purchase intentions of an edible (tomato) and a non-edible (chrysanthemum) greenhouse crop. The study examined five pest management practices and applied conjoint analysis to evaluate the relative importance of the pest management practice compared to several other product factors (price, benefit claims related to the pest management practice, tomato variety/flower colour, quality) in contributing to consumers’ purchase intentions. Out of the factors examined, price (26–29 % relative importance) and the pest management practice (22–25 % relative importance) were the most important to consumers. In both studies, there were segments of the sampled populations (13.5–24 %) for whom the pest management practice was the most important factor driving purchase decisions. These segments had significantly more consumers with low confidence in science and technology and preferred products grown using organic practices or pests’ natural predators. In the tomatoes study (crop intended for consumption), the proportion of pest management conscious consumers nearly doubled compared to the chrysanthemums study. Findings suggest that making consumers aware that a product has been produced using pests’ natural predators (i.e. using biocontrol strategies) for pest management could convince a significant segment of the population to purchase these products over other similar products. When the crop is edible, a higher proportion of consumers becomes concerned with the production practice.

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